Newsline

Author archive: Daisy Yuhas

Bubble wrap made of granite: the ILC and seismic activity

| 23 January 2014 Isn't it a bad idea to build a high-tech high-precision particle accelerators machine in a country that is regularly shaken by earthquakes? Won't the machine have to be rebuilt from scratch when it all starts to move? LC NewsLine investigates what the various teams are doing to prepare the machine for a big shake and finds that granite can also serve as a kind of bubble wrap. "Shaken as one, restored as one" is the catchphrase. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts

| 22 August 2013 The Compact Linear Collider and International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , ,

Particle flow

| 18 April 2013 With the help of the particle flow algorithm, physicists will be able to identify and measure each particle of a collision using the subdetector which provides the best measurement. LCpedia explains. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,

Final focus

| 21 March 2013 What makes the ILC beams far smaller than a human hair? A series of magnets referred to as the ‘final focus,’ designed to maximise chances of collision at the heart of the ILC detectors. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,

Drive Beam

| 21 February 2013 Today is the day the two linear collider projects ILC and CLIC officially unite in the Linear Collider Collaboration. Look forward to more CLIC-related in content in LC NewsLine in the future and get into the swing with this LCpedia entry on the CLIC acceleration technology. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,

Cavity gradient

| 10 January 2013 What is an accelerating gradient? How do particles get accelerated, and how much? LCpedia explains. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , , , ,

Klystron

| 18 October 2012 Superconducting cavities accelerate particles using radiofrequency (RF) power. But where does the power to accelerate a beam by millions of electronvolts come from? The ILC’s power source can provide only about 100 watts, but to push that power up to the required level you need a device called a klystron. The klystron is a power amplifier. It can expand a few tens of watts into millions, or megawatts. Each ILC klystron will supply amplified power to 39 superconducting cavities for the baseline design. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,

Quench

| 4 October 2012 What is a quench? Everything has a limit—superconducting cavities are no exception. Physicists put voltage in their superconducting cavities to boost the energy of particles. But it’s possible to ask for too much from a cavity. When this happens, the cavity fails: the superconducting material becomes normal-conducting, the voltage collapses and the energy escapes. This is called a quench. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,

Beam bunch

| 6 September 2012 Particles in a collider aren’t necessarily evenly dispersed along the beam path. Instead they’re often clumped together in bunches with space in between. The series of bunches are sometimes called a bunch train, a pulse, or simply ‘the beam’. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , , ,

Q – cavity quality factor

| 23 August 2012 Physicists need to understand each accelerator cavity individually before assembling a collider. One of the cavity characteristics physicists measure is called the cavity quality factor, Q factor for short. The LCpedia series continues. Category: LCpedia | Tagged: , ,
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