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Author archive: Barbara Warmbein

Let me not to the marriage of three CADs…

| 23 April 2009 In order to have a detailed and visual model of the ILC tunnels, shafts, accelerator components, beam pipes and support lines, a team from around the world has just shown that they can produce three-dimensional ILC models. These will be crucial for efficient future planning and integration and will now be extended to other areas than the one of the sample exercise. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

ILC: Innovation-Led Cooperation?

| 9 April 2009 New science project in their planning stages are a bit of a hothouse for new ideas, innovative solutions and maybe even breakthroughs in technology. The ILC is right in the middle of this stage: R&D is in full swing, scientists pursue various solutions to meeting the high demands of the machine and detectors. No wonder then that people are already thinking of ways to transfer the technologies developed for the different areas of the ILC to other projects or disciplines: medicine, biology, drug research, computing, environment and many others. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

In the beginning, there was… Susanna

| 12 March 2009 Susanna Guiducci has her head in the clouds – electron clouds, that is. (Sometimes she sits in clouds that gather around the Frascati hills south of Rome where she is based at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati or LNF, but that is not really relevant to this story – just very picturesque.) As new leader of the damping ring group, one of the key R&D projects in the ILC’s Technical Design Phase, she also has her feet firmly planted in electron-positron accelerator physics and has been working on damping rings for ten years. All that experience gives her a clear picture of where the challenges lie in the ILC damping ring design, but she is confident: “I am convinced that the parameters set for the damping rings are feasible.” Category: Profile | Tagged: , , , , , ,

Spring-scrubbing the beam pipe

| 12 March 2009 The ILC is not the only accelerator that has to struggle against electron clouds and their distracting effect on the particle beam. Even the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN may suffer from it, and tests on two of its pre-accelerators, the PS and the SPS, have already proven several techniques with which the electron-cloud build-up can be avoided or at least be brought under better control. One of those techniques is ‘scrubbing’, and it does what it says on the packet: it scrubs the beam pipe clean from the inside. It does not do this with bucket, cloth and detergent, however. Instead, a beam at the highest possible intensity, the limit of what the machines can take, is pumped through, literally getting hoovered by the vacuum pumps. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Mapping the future

| 5 March 2009 When talking about what they know and what they want to find out, physicists like to speak about ‘landscapes’. There are the well-chartered lands of the Standard Model and undiscovered territories like the Terascale – a region that the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN will enter when protons start colliding in autumn. With the LHC and its eventful proton-proton collisions scientists expect a whole range of signatures of expected and new physics, and they will need a machine to follow up on these to get a clearer view. In February, a group of more than one hundred theorists and experimentalists met at CERN for three weeks. Their goal was to outline the landscapes they may find with data from the LHC and to develop strategies for how to pick the right tools for the coming expedition. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

Digging deep

| 12 February 2009 The small town of Schenefeld just outside Hamburg in northern Germany isn't exactly known for its sights or its tourism. Many Schenefeld citizens, however, have recently become tourists in their own neighbourhood: ever since the construction works for the European XFEL started on 8 January, the building site sees a steady flow of visitors stopping by on or from their way to the shops, checking on progress, curious about their new neighbour. While the whole ILC project can learn a lot from this curiosity (namely establishing good contact with neighbours when construction for the collider starts), one specific group is digging deeper: the 'conventional facilities and siting (CF&S)' team is establishing close contacts to experts working on the European XFEL to learn from them and to help when possible. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Harmonics of acceleration

| 8 January 2009 The majority of NewsLine readers are scientists – most of you of the experimental kind. So be honest: how often during the last few weeks, when listening to carols, plucking the strings of your old guitar that you only get out during the holidays or cringing at a dissonant brass band, did you think about the physics and the maths of music? Go to the ILCT-MDB Horizontal Test Stand at Fermilab now and you can experience a perfect third harmonic: that of a string of cavities being tested and assembled into a cryomodule. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , ,

Commission accomplished

| 11 December 2008 When you have a set of new hardware and a clear mission ahead of you, the first step to complete the mission is to commission the hardware. After reconfiguring their storage ring and light source CESR, Cornell University and the international ILC team working on damping ring studies switched on the machine in early October and performed the first electron cloud studies in the low emittance configuration in November. “It was an intense week and we have some very interesting new data,” says Mark Palmer, CesrTA project manager. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Under pressure

| 13 November 2008 The time projection chamber is part of the tracker system of a future ILD detector at the ILC and will one day reproduce highly precise tracks of the particles that passed through its gas. A plot of all the tracks leading to a workshop called ‘the tent’ on the DESY campus would make for an interesting event display: in the course of the last weeks many parts for the detector prototype arrived from destinations around the world, together with their experts. While field cage, cathode and module dummies came from Germany, the anode endplate travelled all the way from Cornell University in the States. France brought a Micromegas readout module, Belgium contributed the trigger logic and the Netherlands the beam trigger equipment for the coming test with cosmic rays or test beam. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , ,

FLASH under ILC charge – almost

| 6 November 2008 More than 1034 times per second per square centimetre — that’s how often electrons and positrons are supposed to collide in the ILC. The project’s accelerator experts have no doubts that it can be done, but they have to demonstrate it, too. An important proof is to run ILC-like beam conditions through a radiofrequency (RF) unit that consists of one klystron and 26 superconducting cavities housed in three cryomodules. Running ILC-like beam conditions means running the cavities at their gradient limits and with 800-microsecond beam pulses with an average current of about nine milliamperes (or mA). The FLASH accelerator at DESY is capable of approaching these ILC-like beam conditions, but they are at the design limits of the machine and are well beyond typical operating conditions. An international team with members from DESY, FNAL, SLAC, KEK, and Argonne have come together for a series of tests that wants to drive an ILC-like beam through FLASH. Category: Around the World | Tagged: ,
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