Tag archive: Cornell

SCRF R&D for ILC upgrade – tin for the future?

| 3 July 2014 Cornell is working on a technology that could make superconducting cavities even more efficient: niobium alloyed with tin. Currently in single-cell research stage, tests show promising results, especially for the quality factor Q. Cornell university has always been a big player in the development of superconducting radio frequency technology SCRF, the technology chosen for the ILC. Even though research into Nb3Sn-cavities is not advanced enough to replace conventional cavities just yet, it might play a big role in future upgrades of the ILC – and in many other accelerators for all kinds of purposes the nearer future. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , ,

From Fermilab Today: Fermilab’s new cavity temperature mapping system commissioned

| 26 July 2012 Fermilab scientists have a new diagnostic tool that could lead to far more efficient accelerator cavities. The temperature mapping system, fitted with 576 sensors, reads the temperature of every square centimetre of cavity surface and might thus help scientists get to the bottom of the problem of why superconducting cavities dissipate much more energy than theory predicts. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , ,

Triple milestone for Cornell’s ERL programme

| 29 March 2012 Researchers at Cornell University's Energy Recovery Linac programme recently achieved three milestones in two months. One of them could lead to more reliable superconducting accelerator cavities. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

The sound of accelerator cavities

| 21 April 2011 Elegant and inexpensive, the second-sound detection system developed at Cornell University helps scientists triangulate the location of hard-to-see accelerator cavity flaws. Helium helps. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

Cornell makes progress on Energy Recovery Linac

| 27 January 2011 The idea behind recycling is straightforward: reuse what you have to make more of the same. Applying this concept, however, is seldom simple.  In the case of Cornell University's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), recycling energy to generate particle beams requires technological advancements that are born from decades of research.  If scientists there fulfil their mission, they'll be able to use particle beams to accelerate particle beams, producing some of the brightest bunches to be made by an accelerator. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , ,