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Tag archive: Kyoto camera

How to keep cavities blemish-free

| 14 July 2011 Worrying about blemishes on the skin is not just an issue for people who pursue personal physical beauty, but also for accelerator scientists. Scientists and engineers at KEK have found a way to deal with unwanted stains on the inner surface of superconducting cavities, which might be one of the causes of performance limitation. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Young scientists at KEK

30 June 2011 Junior high school students in the Tsukuba area visited KEK for their school's job experience programme. Here they use a Kyoto camera to look for defects on the inside of an accelerating cavity. Category: Image of the week | Tagged: , ,

A robot to watch out for defects

| 14 April 2011 A small group of young researchers at DESY, Germany, is working on a robot that could drastically reduce the time it takes to optically inspect a cavity. Their work covers everything from the pure mechanics of the workbench and fine-tuned motors for moving the heavy parts to developing sophisticated methods of automatically analysing the pictures. Cavities might eventually pass the check in two hours instead of the one-and-a-half days it takes today. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , , ,

From KEK: Japanese 9-cell SCRF cavity meets ILC specification

| 9 December 2010 Designing and fabricating an optimal accelerating cavity is not so simple. There are two important parameters scientists are looking for: the gradient of 35 megavolts per meter (MV/m) and the quality factor (Q0) of greater than 0.8Ɨ10^10. A Japanese cavity now fulfilled those requirements for the first time at a test which took place at the Superconducting radiofrequency Test Facility (STF) at KEK, adding momentum towards future mass production. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , , ,

ILC technology gets awarded

| 16 April 2009 On 23 March, the 2008 Nishikawa Award Ceremony was held in Tokyo, and awards were given to three ILC scientists: Yoshihisa Iwashita (Kyoto University), Hitoshi Hayano (KEK) and Yujiro Tajima (Toshiba Co., Ltd). Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Looking inside

| 21 February 2008 At the ILC, roughly 16,000 superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium will accelerate electrons and positrons to the high energy of 500 GeV. Each one-metre-long cavity consists of nine cells, polished to provide micrometre-level surface smoothness and absolutely no impurities. The inside of the cavities need to literally sparkle since any surface blemishes or dust could cause them to lose their superconductivity, making them unable to sustain the electric field needed to accelerate particles. ILC scientists around the world are devoted to trying to get a higher yield rate for producing good-quality cavities by improving surface treatment methods and inspection procedures. A group of scientists from Kyoto University and KEK jointly developed the novel inspection system to take a close look at the interior surface of the cavities, and produced remarkable results. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , ,