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Tag archive: test beam

From SLAC today: SLAC’s historic ‘End Station A’ hosts electron beams again

2 May 2013 Electrons are once again streaming into SLAC's historic End Station A, setting the stage for a new user facility in the huge, concrete hall where the first evidence for quarks was discovered. Fed by billion-particle bunches of high-energy electrons diverted from the linear accelerator supply to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the new beamline, called the End Station Test Beam (ESTB), will initially host three types of experiments: General beam physics and machine-detector interface studies for the proposed International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider, radiation hardness tests on detector components and R&D for high-energy physics detectors, which will use secondary particles created when the main beam hits a target. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

Good signal, little noise

| 18 April 2013 A concept to save space and power for future particle detectors called power pulsing has recently been tested and proven to work on one of the possible calorimeter options for the future ILC detectors. The silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter prototype took data in test beam and magnet at the German lab DESY. The project is currently run by groups from France and Japan. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , , , , ,

An eye on the pulse

| 6 December 2012 The technical prototype of the silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, one of the calorimeter options for the ILC’s ILD detector, is about to spend its first weeks in a test beam at DESY. The team will test its performance under power-pulsed operation and take detector development one step further towards a real collider detector. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

Strip teaser

| 1 November 2012 A team of two scientists and four students from Shinshu University of Japan and Kyungpook National University of Korea have just packed up their cables, laptops and scintillator strips and left a test beam at DESY with many interesting results in their luggage. They tested the scintillator-strip-based electromagnetic calorimeter (ScECAL), one of the potential layers of a future ILC detector. Category: Image of the week | Tagged: , , , , ,

Quite attrack-tive

| 19 July 2012 Tracks show the paths of particles passing through the time projection chamber, the tracker prototype for the ILD detector, in a DESY test beam last week. Six brand-new readout modules of the Micromegas type - one possible module type for the final detector - were mounted to the TPC endplate and produced beautiful tracks both from cosmic and beam particles. Category: Image of the week | Tagged: , , , , ,

Large-scale powering scheme has scientists’ pulses racing

| 17 May 2012 For the first time, a large-scale calorimeter prototype for the ILC, fully equipped with embedded power-pulsed electronics, successfully passed a test beam at CERN a few weeks ago. A prototype of more than one cubic metre in size of CALICE’s Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter successfully recorded and tracked 1 million particles from CERN’s SPS accelerator beam (muons and pions). Thanks to power pulsing, the detector front-end electronics was periodically disabled and enabled, following the beam cycle. Read more and view more photos about the test beam. Category: Image of the week | Tagged: , , , ,

Checkout of ATF starts with test beam

| 2 June 2011 On 26 May, a first test beam steered through the linac of the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK, Japan, with the same energy as before the March 2011 earthquake. Engineers are now working on the magnet alignment at the beam transportation line. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

TPC in the right light

17 February 2011 The test beam season is about to start and the prototype of the ILD time projection chamber is being prepared for a round of new tests in the DESY testbeam facility - captured here by a professional photographer. Category: Image of the week | Tagged: , ,

Finding the nano-size beam

26 January 2006 The International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. Making a head-on collision with a few nanometers beams, each beam travelling across some 20 km in the linear accelerator, is a bit like colliding two baseballs -- one thrown from earth and the other from Saturn! It is important for the ongoing ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved -- ideally using a beam-based stability measurement. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,
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