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Tag archive: KEK

New type of thermal sensors for vertical testing of nine-cell cavities for the ILC

8 October 2009 Scientists at Kyoto university are testing a new type of thermal sensor for superconducting cavities on the vertical test for ILC at the Superconducting radiofrequency Test Facility (STF) at KEK. This sensor is under development by a Kyoto-KEK collaboration The team is developing this new device to address issues in the components of the sensor – tangled wires and resistors. At STF, a carbon resistor is used for vertical testing of nine-cell cavities. They have already installed 350 sensors on the outer surface of the nine-cell cavity, and 700 lead wires were needed to connect both ends of sensors through cryogenic area and outside, in order to measure the temperature. “For a shorter developing time, I have chosen carbon resistor which is technologically proven in the past superconducting cavity R&D. This structure is simple, not so sophisticated.” said Yasuchika 'Kirk' Yamamoto, the scientist at KEK who designed the present system. When the cavity is being tested, it is cooled to 2 kelvins, and has to stay at that temperature as much as possible. In general, it is best to use the smallest possible number of lead wires to prevent heat invasion to the cryogenic area. “The current system needs too many lead wires, and the production of the carbon resistor has been discontinued, we thought we should develop a new thermal sensor to replace it,” he said. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

GRACE-ful students

| 10 September 2009 One of the most important subject in future high-energy experiments is to search and investigate the Higgs particle – the last missing piece of the Standard Model. Another important subject is the investigation of physics beyond the Standard Model such as supersymmetry. From 31 August to 3 September, the first “GRACE school”, the school for one of the important tools for quests in high-energy physics, was held at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan in cooperation with Kogakuin University. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

International collaborators at ATF2

27 August 2009 At the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, researchers around the world are testing the feasibility of their accelerator techniques. Because the ILC beams are very small, very accurate and precise beam diagnostic measurements are required. Physicists from Notre Dame University, US, and Oxford University, UK, visited ATF2 in July to make tests relevant to beam diagnostic measurement. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , , ,

A grand tuning voyage

| 27 August 2009 When groups from different countries work together the usual procedure is to send the people to the machines they are working on. A team of engineers and technicians from DESY, Fermilab and KEK decided to do the exact opposite: they sent the machines to the people. On 3 August two machines constructed at DESY embarked on a voyage to Fermilab in the US. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

New cavity production facility for future industrialisation

| 30 April 2009 (...) One of the most important plans for the ILC project is to build a new superconducting radiofrequency (rf) cavity production facility on KEK premises, aiming to gain experiences for industrialisation and future mass-production. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , ,

From SLAC Today: A Flight Simulator for the World’s Smallest Beam

2 April 2009 Commissioning has begun at the Japan-based Accelerator Test Facility 2, a major technology test bed for future accelerators, including the proposed International Linear Collider, or ILC. During the two-year commissioning process, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory physicists are shuttling back and forth to KEK, the high-energy accelerator lab in Tsukuba, to join an international team of scientists working around the clock to get the accelerator's final focus system up and running. When fully commissioned, this system will squeeze the facility's electron beam down to a slender ribbon just 35 nanometers thick—the narrowest beam of particles ever achieved. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , ,

From KEK: New beam line for R&D of nano-meter electron beam has been started at Accelerator Test Facility

22 January 2009 A new beamline for R&D toward nano-meter electron beam has started operation at KEK's Accelerator Test Facility - ATF. This new beamline, called ATF2, is an extension of ATF, and the focus of the research there will be on establishing the technologies for creation and control of a nano-meter-sized electron beam. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

Pixel collaboration

13 November 2008 Plans are taking shape to form a new group to coordinate and stimulate R&D on monolithic and vertically integrated pixel detectors for scientific applications in high-energy physics and beyond. In a joint message, the directorates of CERN, KEK and Fermilab have offered their support. They suggested the formation of a regionally balanced coordination board to take this forward. From discussions in recent reviews and workshops, we think there is an opportunity for the many efforts underway worldwide to benefit a larger community. We already have strong collaborations for the development of vertical integration and monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS). The new world-wide effort would build upon the existing collaborations and open the technology developments to other scientific areas. We will discuss how best to achieve this at upcoming meetings. Our suggestions will then be comunicated to the directorates of CERN, KEK and Fermilab. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , ,

Preparations for S1-global at the STF at KEK

| 9 October 2008 Research and development on superconducting radiofrequency (rf) cavities, cryomodules and operational units is at the core of our programme to develop the technologies, the best possible machine design and an implementation plan for the ILC. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , , , , ,

Achieving tiny beam spot sizes with ATF2

| 2 October 2008 The ILC's beams pass through each accelerating element once before they are directed to collide with the beam travelling in the opposite direction. This poses the two main challenges in the ILC: to achieve a very high gradient in the accelerator in order to make it as short as possible while achieving the desired energy, and to achieve very small beam spots to maximise the probability of collisions by the crossing beams. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , ,
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