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Tag archive: JLab

From CERN Courier: Viewpoint: SRF technology comes full circle

26 November 2008 Nearly a half-century ago, researchers at Stanford University began investigating superconducting RF (SRF) acceleration. They would not have been surprised to learn that by 1994, SRF had come into large-scale use in Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, or that by 2008 it was planned as the enormous, ultra-cold, dynamic-but-delicate heart of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC). Nor would they be surprised to learn that this complex technology's challenges nevertheless continue to vex accelerator builders. In my view, it's time for the accelerator community to go back to where the pioneers at Stanford began, hit the pause button, and take a careful look at more than four decades of SRF R&D. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

From Jefferson Lab News: ILC Electron Source Gets Help from JLab

23 October 2008 With the activation of the LHC, or Large Hadron Collider, some particle physicists are now looking forward to the next big machine. For many, that's the International Linear Collider. The ILC aims to break new ground in particle physics by slamming a beam of electrons into a beam of the electron's alter ego: the positron. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

Progress and plans for ILC R&D at JLab

| 16 October 2008 Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) in Newport News, Virginia is a major DoE laboratory for Nuclear Physics. The laboratory has a pioneering 6 GeV electron accelerator that is based on superconducting RF accelerating technology. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , , , ,

US-manufactured cavity achieves high gradient

| 6 December 2007 Turkey, stuffing and pumpkin pie – all things you might appreciate on Thanksgiving. ILC scientists in the United States had something extra to be thankful for this year. On 21 November, the day before the Thanksgiving holiday in the US, a superconducting cavity manufactured by Advanced Energy Systems in Medford, NY, reached a high gradient of 32.6 megavolts per metre (MV/m) at Jefferson Laboratory. “This is the first US-built ILC nine-cell cavity to reach a gradient close to the ILC specification,” said Rongli Geng, the lead scientist at JLab on the nine-cell high-gradient cavity processing R&D. JLab scientists are hopeful that the cavity, dubbed AES2, will reach an even higher gradient after further processing. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , ,

From Jefferson Lab News: Jefferson Lab Cooks Up the Perfect Cavity

22 March 2007 While it's said that opposites attract, particle physicists are taking no chances. In hopes of learning what the universe is made of, they're preparing to build a machine that will accelerate and smash together electrons and their opposites, positrons, 14,000 times every second. Like Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), the proposed new machine, the International Linear Collider (ILC), is being designed to use superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity technology. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,

Argonne-Fermilab BCP System Coming Together

| 4 January 2007 To make the superconducting cavities for the ILC sparkle, they must undergo a series of surface treatments to make them as clean and pure as possible – a necessity for achieving high accelerating gradients. Electropolishing and Buffered Chemical Polishing, the two types of chemical treatments required for the cavities, are not simple tasks. They involve tricky chemicals and a detailed recipe for producing the best cavities possible. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , , , ,
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