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Tag archive: CERN

Textbook tests with tungsten

| 9 September 2010 In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , , ,

From CERN: ICHEP 2010 conference highlights first results from the LHC

29 July 2010 Geneva, 26 July 2010. First results from the LHC at CERN1 are being revealed at ICHEP, the world’s largest international conference on particle physics, which has attracted more than 1000 participants to its venue in Paris. The spokespersons of the four major experiments at the LHC – ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb – are today presenting measurements from the first three months of successful LHC operation at 3.5 TeV per beam, an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at a particle accelerator. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

Wanted: linear collider studies leader

6 May 2010 If you have always wanted to lead a global team of accelerator and detector experts to work with you on the electron-positron collider concepts of the future, directing the way particle physics will take after results from the Large Hadron Collider LHC, then the following CERN position will certainly interest you. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , ,

Celebrating first 7-TeV collisions at the LHC

| 8 April 2010 This past week marked the beginning of a new era for particle physics with the much publicised achievement of establishing the first 7-TeV collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). [...] We should soon begin to have a glimpse of Terascale physics from searches for the origin of mass to looking for evidence of a new symmetry in nature that could even explain the dark matter. Even more intriguing is the real possibility for totally unexpected surprises that are awaiting us. We are looking to LHC science to establish what kind of lepton collider will be needed to best exploit the energy frontier in the longer term. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , , , , ,

From CERN: LHC research programme gets underway

1 April 2010 Geneva, 30 March 2010. Beams collided at 7 TeV in the LHC at 13:06 CEST, marking the start of the LHC research programme. Particle physicists around the world are looking forward to a potentially rich harvest of new physics as the LHC begins its first long run at an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at a particle accelerator. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

From symmetry breaking: Demystifying the LHC shutdown

18 March 2010 Yesterday the science news media and twitterverse were abuzz following a BBC News article announcing “LHC to shut down for a year to address design faults.” Readers – and the news outlets that frantically re-reported the BBC article – assumed that CERN had found a new problem with the LHC and announced an imminent shutdown. Neither is the case. Here, we join our fellow science writers and bloggers in setting the record straight about the LHC’s next long shutdown. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

From CERN: Outcome from Chamonix: Better in the long run

4 February 2010 Last week, the Chamonix workshop once again proved its worth as a place where all the stakeholders in the LHC can come together, take difficult decisions and reach a consensus on important issues for the future of particle physics. The most important decision we reached last week is to run the LHC for 18 to 24 months at a collision energy of 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). After that, we’ll go into a long shutdown in which we’ll do all the necessary work to allow us to reach the LHC’s design collision energy of 14 TeV for the next run. This means that when beams go back into the LHC later this month, we’ll be entering the longest phase of accelerator operation in CERN’s history, scheduled to take us into summer or autumn 2011. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

From CERN: The LHC is back

25 November 2009 Particle beams are once again circulating in the world Category: Uncategorized | Tagged: ,

From CERN: Two circulating beams bring first collisions in the LHC

25 November 2009 Today the LHC circulated two beams simultaneously for the first time, allowing the operators to test the synchronization of the beams and giving the experiments their first chance to look for proton-proton collisions. With just one bunch of particles circulating in each direction, the beams can be made to cross in up to two places in the ring. From early in the afternoon, the beams were made to cross at points 1 and 5, home to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, both of which were on the look out for collisions. Later, beams crossed at points 2 and 8, ALICE and LHCb. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

CERN prepares for LHC commissioning

| 15 October 2009 (...) We were very fortunate to hear a timely report from Philippe Lebrun on the status of the LHC and plans for commissioning at the American Linear Collider Physics Group workshop in Albuquerque at the end of September. -- By Barry Barish Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: ,
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