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Tag archive: detector R&D

AIDA trumpets

| 20 May 2010 AIDA is an acronym for the contract recently approved by European Union in favour of detector R&D for particle physics. It means Advanced European Infrastructures for Detectors at Accelerators. I suspect that this acronym, inspired by the famous opera from Verdi, can be viewed as reflecting the large number of participants involved in this ambitious Opera(tion). Category: Research Director's Report | Tagged: , , ,

Returning victorious

| 13 May 2010 The Advanced European Infrastructures for Detectors at Accelerators (AIDA) proposal has received top grades from the European Commission, meaning that the multi-disciplinary multi-institutional detector development project will definitely go ahead. Out of 47 submitted proposals, AIDA came second with a score of 14.5 out of 15. The only catch is that the EC cut the proposed funding from 10 to 8 million Euros, reducing the full funding to just under 28 million Euros over four years. The project partners are now in the process of redefining the scope of the project in order to match the new budget, but are planning to keep as much as possible to the originally foreseen work. The coordinators and the EC are currently in a negotiation phase and the starting date of AIDA is expected for early 2011. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

SOI technology for next-generation sensors

15 October 2009 What do you visualise when you are asked about a sensor? There are many sensors around us. For example, CCDs (Charge Coupled Device), which is the basis of today’s digital camera, and the technology for this year's Nobel Prize in Physics are also sensors. Thus, sensors are absolutely necessary devices for our daily life and also important technologies for the International Liner Collider. In the last years, many new sensors have been developed for the ILC, one of them being pixel sensors using Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology for particle detectors, under development at KEK’s Detector Technology Project Office. This sensor is expected to serve as one of the alternatives for particle sensors used in such parts as the silicon vertex detector. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , , , , ,

3-D silicon technology project draws together industry and research for ILC

9 July 2009 The International Linear Collider had more than a dozen circuit pixel-detector technologies to choose from for their vertex detectors. Now, they can choose from many more design options thanks to a ground-breaking partnership among national laboratories, universities and industry. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

University of Notre Dame collaborates on muon detector development project

21 May 2009 Most particle physicists think that the International Linear Collider (ILC) could revolutionise our understanding of the universe, and will challenge inquisitive minds of particle physics. This is a field where University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, US, has been actively participating, particularly in muon detector research and in organising outreach activities between students, high school teachers and physicists. Category: Around the World | Tagged: ,

Detector developers meet in Korea

5 March 2009 In mid February detector scientists from around the world met in two subsequent detector meetings held in Korea: the ILD (International Large Detector) Workshop at Ewha Campus Complex in Seoul from 16 to 18 February and the CALICE (Calorimeter for the Linear Collider Experiment) Collaboration Spring Meeting at Kyungpook National University in Daegu from 19 to 20 February. Category: Around the World | Tagged: ,

Cautious optimism for US-university detector R&D funding

| 22 January 2009 Several recent positive developments are moving us forward on the path towards realising the ILC. These include excellent detector R&D results and significant progress on the Letters of Intent (LOI) for the various detector concepts. Category: Research Director's Report | Tagged: , ,

Under pressure

| 13 November 2008 The time projection chamber is part of the tracker system of a future ILD detector at the ILC and will one day reproduce highly precise tracks of the particles that passed through its gas. A plot of all the tracks leading to a workshop called ‘the tent’ on the DESY campus would make for an interesting event display: in the course of the last weeks many parts for the detector prototype arrived from destinations around the world, together with their experts. While field cage, cathode and module dummies came from Germany, the anode endplate travelled all the way from Cornell University in the States. France brought a Micromegas readout module, Belgium contributed the trigger logic and the Netherlands the beam trigger equipment for the coming test with cosmic rays or test beam. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , , , ,

Pixel collaboration

13 November 2008 Plans are taking shape to form a new group to coordinate and stimulate R&D on monolithic and vertically integrated pixel detectors for scientific applications in high-energy physics and beyond. In a joint message, the directorates of CERN, KEK and Fermilab have offered their support. They suggested the formation of a regionally balanced coordination board to take this forward. From discussions in recent reviews and workshops, we think there is an opportunity for the many efforts underway worldwide to benefit a larger community. We already have strong collaborations for the development of vertical integration and monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS). The new world-wide effort would build upon the existing collaborations and open the technology developments to other scientific areas. We will discuss how best to achieve this at upcoming meetings. Our suggestions will then be comunicated to the directorates of CERN, KEK and Fermilab. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , , , ,

A welcome cage

| 28 August 2008 The international time projection chamber (TPC) team that works on R&D for future ILC detectors used to have a bit of a running gag. Somebody would proclaim that “the field cage will arrive next week” and everybody else would chuckle because week after week it didn’t arrive. Chuckling days are over now: after several years of planning the cage for the large TPC prototype, ordering it from industry, checking the quality, rejecting parts of the product and reordering, the nearly one-metre-long barrel with an inner diameter of 72 centimetres has finally arrived at DESY in Hamburg. First tests indicate that it will finally meet the team's high requirements. Category: Feature | Tagged: , , ,