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Tag archive: ATF2

ATF2 enters the nanometre world

| 29 April 2010 The ATF2 collaboration has recently succeeded to obtain vertical beam size of less than one micrometre and consequently has now entered into the nanometre world in the final focus system. In this corner, I will describe what is AFT2 and how we reached this challenging beam size. -- Toshiaki Tauchi Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , ,

From SLAC Today: ATF2 Narrows the Focus

14 January 2010 Last month the KEK facility in Japan hosted the ninth Project Meeting for the Accelerator Test Facility 2, or ATF2, and a few SLAC staff traveled overseas to participate. The group reviewed progress made in 2009, plans for 2010, and the possibility of extended studies beyond the primary ATF2 goals in 2011, 2012 and beyond. A total of 44 collaborators, including 28 from outside Japan, discussed the technical progress of the ATF2, which began commissioning in December of 2008. The program also covered the future of the project in the face of some major cuts to science funding bodies by the Japanese government. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , ,

From SLAC today: People: Andrei Seryi

15 October 2009 Since beginning his career in 1986, SLAC senior scientist and project manager for FACET Andrei Seryi has worked at five labs in three countries, with the last 10 years at SLAC. In this decade, Seryi has led international collaborations to design and build linear accelerator experimental facilities, all while continuing his accelerator research and design projects at SLAC. Category: Feature | Tagged: ,

From SLAC Today: A Flight Simulator for the World’s Smallest Beam

2 April 2009 Commissioning has begun at the Japan-based Accelerator Test Facility 2, a major technology test bed for future accelerators, including the proposed International Linear Collider, or ILC. During the two-year commissioning process, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory physicists are shuttling back and forth to KEK, the high-energy accelerator lab in Tsukuba, to join an international team of scientists working around the clock to get the accelerator's final focus system up and running. When fully commissioned, this system will squeeze the facility's electron beam down to a slender ribbon just 35 nanometers thick—the narrowest beam of particles ever achieved. Category: Around the World | Tagged: , ,

From KEK: New beam line for R&D of nano-meter electron beam has been started at Accelerator Test Facility

22 January 2009 A new beamline for R&D toward nano-meter electron beam has started operation at KEK's Accelerator Test Facility - ATF. This new beamline, called ATF2, is an extension of ATF, and the focus of the research there will be on establishing the technologies for creation and control of a nano-meter-sized electron beam. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

Asian ILC researchers gathered in Korea

| 23 October 2008 From 29 to 30 September, the second Asia ILC R&D Seminar was held at Kyungpook National University (KNU) in Korea with help from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Core University Program and the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation. This workshop aimed to review the progress of R&D for the ILC accelerator in Asia region, and to promote regional and inter-regional collaborations on the accelerator and active participations from individual countries to ILC, focusing on the installation schedule and preparation for commissioning. Category: Feature | Tagged: , ,

2nd Asia ILC R&D Seminar

| 23 October 2008 The ILC Global Design Effort is structured around a regional organisation, where we have regional directors, a regionally supported common fund. We rotate our more general meetings between Asian, the Americas and Europe. It is equally important that we carry out coherent regional technical programmes, and regional technical meetings are an important step in that direction. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , , , ,

Achieving tiny beam spot sizes with ATF2

| 2 October 2008 The ILC's beams pass through each accelerating element once before they are directed to collide with the beam travelling in the opposite direction. This poses the two main challenges in the ILC: to achieve a very high gradient in the accelerator in order to make it as short as possible while achieving the desired energy, and to achieve very small beam spots to maximise the probability of collisions by the crossing beams. Category: Director's Corner | Tagged: , , ,
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